Indigenous History Month: Dr. Peter Edmund Jones (Kahkewaquonaby)

In 1866, Dr. Peter Edmund Jones became North America’s first licensed Indigenous physician after attending medical school at the University of Toronto and Queen’s College (now Queen’s University). He became a strong voice for the rights and health of Indigenous peoples, lobbying the federal government on behalf of Indigenous peoples, and promoting tuberculosis vaccination programs and advocating for public health initiatives.⁠ … More Indigenous History Month: Dr. Peter Edmund Jones (Kahkewaquonaby)

The Story of Dr. Harold Tovell and His Love of Art and Medicine

Dr. Harold M. Tovell was born in 1887, and is considered one of Toronto’s pioneering radiologists. He was an arts and medical student at the University of Toronto, which was where he met his wife Ruth Lillian Massey through her cousin Vincent Massey, the first Canadian to hold the position of Governor General of Canada. Tovell and Massey were married in 1910 and lived first in New York and then in Munich, where Tovell trained under Dr. Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, the discoverer of x-rays.⁠ … More The Story of Dr. Harold Tovell and His Love of Art and Medicine

The History of Temporary Military Hospitals in Kingston

Kingston was especially hard-hit by these events compared to other towns. Even during a pandemic just over a hundred years ago, Kingston served the same role of regional health care centre as it did during the COVID pandemic. As the largest city between Ottawa and Toronto, Kingston’s healthcare facilities have always serviced a particularly large surrounding area. On top of this, Andrew Belyea, a previous Margaret Angus Research Fellow for the Museum, notes that Kingston was a military hub around the time of the First World War, with a very large number of soldiers stationed in or otherwise filtered through town (find his article here). This created a larger-than-expected need for hospital care when the war ended and soldiers began returning to Canada – a need that would be difficult to meet. … More The History of Temporary Military Hospitals in Kingston

The Story of Dr. James Third and his x-ray innovations

He began working with x-rays in 1897, effectively picking up where John Cochrane, the first man to bring x-rays to Kingston, had left off. Dr. Third was responsible for the installation of x-rays in Kingston General Hospital, and he soon began discovering new ways they could be used for diagnosis, such as detecting pneumonia and tuberculosis, as well as using a fluorescent screen with the x-ray tube to observe real-time movement of the heart and lungs. … More The Story of Dr. James Third and his x-ray innovations

The Lived Experience of COVID-19 in Canada presentation recording available

Savannah Sewell (MARF 2021) presented the results of her project, in which she endeavored to create a holistic and human narrative focused account of the lived experience of COVID-19. Savannah spoke to the hurdles and highlights of her experience in amassing a foundational COVID-19 Collection for the Museum of Health Care, and offered examples of the artifacts and narratives collected. … More The Lived Experience of COVID-19 in Canada presentation recording available

The Story of Dr. Charles Kirk Clarke and the Rockwood Asylum

the psychiatric field, Clarke worked first as a clinical assistant at the Asylum for the Insane in Toronto, and then as assistant medical superintendent of the Hamilton Asylum. In 1882, he moved to Kingston and began work as assistant medical superintendent at Rockwood Asylum. … More The Story of Dr. Charles Kirk Clarke and the Rockwood Asylum

The Story of George Taylor Fulford I and his pink pills for pale people

Fulford and Co’s most famous remedy– and the one which solidified the wealth and status of George Taylor Fulford– was Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People, the patent for which Fulford bought from Brockville doctor William Frederick Jackson in 1890. He advertised the pills very widely and cleverly, using patient testimonials in advertisements that look like little newspaper articles. … More The Story of George Taylor Fulford I and his pink pills for pale people

The Story of Bennie Stalk and his life-saving operation

William Benjamin Stalker, or Bennie, was only ten years old when he was accidentally shot by his twelve year old brother in September 1901. His arm was severely damaged, and within two days it became gangrenous. Bennie was later sent to Kingston General Hospital from his home near Plevna, Ontario– an eleven hour trip. … More The Story of Bennie Stalk and his life-saving operation