Museum of Health Care marks moment in time with COVID-19 update

The Museum of Health Care at Kingston has updated its popular Vaccines and Immunization gallery to reflect the latest innovations in vaccination technology. Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation was first installed in 2013. Developed with Guest Curator Dr. Christopher Rutty, and funded in part by the Kingston and United Way Community Fund, … More Museum of Health Care marks moment in time with COVID-19 update

Globe and Mail: How lessons from the past can help shape future health outcomes

That’s where the Museum of Health Care aims to make a contribution. “Our objects can tell a million stories, not just about vaccines but also about vaccine hesitancy,” says Ms. McGowan. “A lot of the discussion that was the backlash against the smallpox vaccine, for example, is not that different from what you hear today. It is really interesting to see this continuity.” The question then becomes what lessons we are willing to learn, and Ms. McGowan believes that seeing an iron lung, a smallpox vaccination certificate or a poster about wearing a mask during the 1918-19 influenza epidemic can provide an extra incentive for seeking out valid evidence. … More Globe and Mail: How lessons from the past can help shape future health outcomes

What Do You Mean Museums Aren’t Forever? The Whats and Whys of Deaccessioning

Deaccessioning is the formal removal of an item from a museum’s permanent collection. The important thing to know about deaccessioning is that it’s mostly about paperwork and about status. An item can be deaccessioned without moving from its spot on a shelf. Physical removal of the item is a different and related process, called disposal (disposal in this case doesn’t translate to “garbage,” it just means putting the object somewhere else). We can deaccession items and not dispose of them, but a museum should never dispose of an item without deaccessioning it. … More What Do You Mean Museums Aren’t Forever? The Whats and Whys of Deaccessioning

Doors Open 2022 at the Museum of Health Care

The Museum will be open for the weekend! If you haven’t had a chance to visit yet, here it is! Event dates and times: Saturday, September 24th 10am-4pm Sunday, September 25th 10am-1pm Visit us during Doors Open Kingston and experience Canada’s healthcare story brought to life through: Behind the Scenes Collections Tours (registration required) Specially … More Doors Open 2022 at the Museum of Health Care

So You’ve Got a Curator. Now What?

The Museum of Health Care at Kingston has hired a curator! Huzzah!
But some of you may be wondering: what does that actually mean? What on earth is a curator and what do they do? It’s both simple and surprisingly hard to answer. You’re probably at least vaguely aware that a curator is someone who works in a museum. You might have seen a curator in a movie, usually in the form of a pretentious, stodgy academic peevishly insisting that the hero stop touching the exhibits and with pretty even odds on getting murdered by a supernatural force trapped in some ancient artifact (as far as movie professions go, curators tend to have lifespans approximately equal to cops the day before retirement). You may have heard of someone curating a social media feed or a Pinterest board or read a thinkpiece on why calling everyone who collects content a curator will be the downfall of society. All of which can make it hard to figure out what exactly a museum curator does.
More So You’ve Got a Curator. Now What?

Live! From the Museum Virtual Programming Now Available

directly from the Museum of Health Care. Facilitated by experienced Museum staff, students will take a step back in time to explore healthcare history and form connections to current health related practices and experiences. These sessions will use the Museum’s collection of artifacts to tell the fascinating story of Canada’s healthcare past in a relatable and tangible way. … More Live! From the Museum Virtual Programming Now Available