From Apothecary Shop to Independent Science: Celebrating National Pharmacist Day

The United States annually recognizes pharmacists’ contribution to patient healthcare, celebrating National Pharmacist Day, each January 12.  Pharmacists apply their extensive knowledge of the chemical composition of medicines to help patients manage disease and pain.  … More From Apothecary Shop to Independent Science: Celebrating National Pharmacist Day

World AIDS Day 2012

December 1st 2012 will mark the 24th year of World AIDS Day. Beginning in 1988, Worlds AIDS Day was the first ever global health day. It aims to support people around the world who have been affected by HIV and remember those who were lost to the virus. The World AIDS Day initiative works to eradicate the stigma surrounding the virus and to raise awareness and funds for prevention and research. … More World AIDS Day 2012

Medical Contributions of The Great War: Blood Transfusion

Prior to World War One, blood transfusion was a rarely performed and risky procedure. On the eve of the war, scientific development in relation to transfusion technology progressed making it a more viable procedure. Survival rates on the front lines increased as new transfusion techniques were mastered. The benefits of the medical developments that occurred during the war should not only be remembered on Remembrance Day, as blood transfusions continue to save hundreds of lives each day. … More Medical Contributions of The Great War: Blood Transfusion

Raising Awareness about Tuberculosis – World TB Day, 24 March 2012 Pt. 2

Many people in the West have never thought about tuberculosis as a risk to their health.  Tuberculosis is often considered to be a disease of the past. In other locations around the world tuberculosis is a dangerous epidemic that affects thousands of people and their communities. 1.7 million people died from TB in 2009.  … More Raising Awareness about Tuberculosis – World TB Day, 24 March 2012 Pt. 2

Raising Awareness about Tuberculosis – World TB Day, 24 March 2012 Pt. 1

Tuberculosis is caused by an infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, rod-shaped bacteria that are spread mostly through air-born droplets or dust micro-particles of dried sputum.Those who develop active pulmonary tuberculosis experience a range of signs and symptoms, including chest pain, cough, weight loss, pallor, fever, and night sweats. … More Raising Awareness about Tuberculosis – World TB Day, 24 March 2012 Pt. 1

A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the Beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine

Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. was born 1827 in Essex, England. Lister found that 45-50% of amputation patients later died of infection.  Spurred by this statistic, he undertook the experiments on the prevention of infection that earned him wide renown. … More A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the Beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine

Fenwick Operating Theatre: a life-saving surgery in Edwardian Kingston

At the heart of this story is young William Benjamin Stalker, who was born in 1891. The clinical details of his misadventure and life-saving surgery are preserved in the surgeon’s report detailing the boy’s accident and medical treatment in the January 1902 Kingston Medical Quarterly. … More Fenwick Operating Theatre: a life-saving surgery in Edwardian Kingston

Funding Success for Museum Collection

We are excited to announce that Ontario’s Museums and Technology Fund has granted $15,000 to the Museum of Health Care for the development of a new feature on our website entitled “From the Collection”. To be developed over the next year, this page will include a series of short illustrated profiles for various objects, images, and documents drawn from the MHC collections. … More Funding Success for Museum Collection